Forums The Vibe Chat Do any of you know when things are gonna happen before they actually do ?

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  • #1051209
    mungo1972
    Participant

    Hi All ,
    This happens to me not so much now but still does , but do you ever find yourself knowing whats about to happen before it does ? . For an example and it happens mostly when im driving , but in other situations as well . For example i was driving along a road past a row of houses , i see this kid come around the corner on a push bike and some how with out seeing i know the second kid isnt gonna make the turn on the foot path and end up falling in the road . This i saw all before it happened and before i knew there was a second kid . Yet still i moved out to the center of the road even though the first kid had passed me .

    Some call it a sixth sense ? but do any of you out there have experiences that are similiar ? , give us a few stories just to let me know im not a freak !!!!!

    regards
    Mungo

    #1241754
    GiantMidget
    Participant

    I know exactly what you mean Mungo. this will sound silly but when I’m at work I will suddenly think of a random scene of a random tv program and then later on that exact episode is on. I also used to be able to tell when the police would turn up. We would be sitting in a car park smoking weed and I would suddenly start feeling weird and that would be the signal to hide everything. I was really good at this but since I’ve been doing poodle this particular talent has left me.

    I genuinely believe I have some sort of psychic ability, It’s just a question of honing it!

    #1241755
    DaftFader
    Participant

    @mungo1972 442270 wrote:

    Hi All ,
    This happens to me not so much now but still does , but do you ever find yourself knowing whats about to happen before it does ? . For an example and it happens mostly when im driving , but in other situations as well . For example i was driving along a road past a row of houses , i see this kid come around the corner on a push bike and some how with out seeing i know the second kid isnt gonna make the turn on the foot path and end up falling in the road . This i saw all before it happened and before i knew there was a second kid . Yet still i moved out to the center of the road even though the first kid had passed me .

    Some call it a sixth sense ? but do any of you out there have experiences that are similiar ? , give us a few stories just to let me know im not a freak !!!!!

    regards
    Mungo

    I get this sometimes .. it’s strange … another thing to think about is … mby you made it happen! O.o

    #1241739
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    I have had this at work – I think its more intuition, and knowledge of non verbal cues, picking up on atmosphere (and maybe experience) and i have actually save someones life on more than one occasion due to trusting in it

    I read a book called ‘Blink’ that you will defo find informative Mungo – if you’ve not read it before – I’ll post the link, it talks about firemen / police etc and proposes a rationale for why

    gladwell dot com – blink

    BLINK

    1. What is “Blink” about?

    It’s a book about rapid cognition, about the kind of thinking that happens in a blink of an eye. When you meet someone for the first time, or walk into a house you are thinking of buying, or read the first few sentences of a book, your mind takes about two seconds to jump to a series of conclusions. Well, “Blink” is a book about those two seconds, because I think those instant conclusions that we reach are really powerful and really important and, occasionally, really good.

    You could also say that it’s a book about intuition, except that I don’t like that word. In fact it never appears in “Blink.” Intuition strikes me as a concept we use to describe emotional reactions, gut feelings–thoughts and impressions that don’t seem entirely rational. But I think that what goes on in that first two seconds is perfectly rational. It’s thinking–its just thinking that moves a little faster and operates a little more mysteriously than the kind of deliberate, conscious decision-making that we usually associate with “thinking.” In “Blink” I’m trying to understand those two seconds. What is going on inside our heads when we engage in rapid cognition? When are snap judgments good and when are they not? What kinds of things can we do to make our powers of rapid cognition better?

    2. How can thinking that takes place so quickly be at all useful? Don’t we make the best decisions when we take the time to carefully evaluate all available and relevant information?

    Certainly that’s what we’ve always been told. We live in a society dedicated to the idea that we’re always better off gathering as much information and spending as much time as possible in deliberation. As children, this lesson is drummed into us again and again: haste makes waste, look before you leap, stop and think. But I don’t think this is true. There are lots of situations–particularly at times of high pressure and stress–when haste does not make waste, when our snap judgments and first impressions offer a much better means of making sense of the world.

    One of the stories I tell in “Blink” is about the Emergency Room doctors at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. That’s the big public hospital in Chicago, and a few years ago they changed the way they diagnosed heart attacks. They instructed their doctors to gather less information on their patients: they encouraged them to zero in on just a few critical pieces of information about patients suffering from chest pain–like blood pressure and the ECG–while ignoring everything else, like the patient’s age and weight and medical history. And what happened? Cook County is now one of the best places in the United States at diagnosing chest pain.

    Not surprisingly, it was really hard to convince the physicians at Cook County to go along with the plan, because, like all of us, they were committed to the idea that more information is always better. But I describe lots of cases in “Blink” where that simply isn’t true. There’s a wonderful phrase in psychology–“the power of thin slicing”–which says that as human beings we are capable of making sense of situations based on the thinnest slice of experience. I have an entire chapter in “Blink” on how unbelievably powerful our thin-slicing skills are. I have to say that I still find some of the examples in that chapter hard to believe.

    3. Where did you get the idea for “Blink”?

    Believe it or not, it’s because I decided, a few years ago, to grow my hair long. If you look at the author photo on my last book, “The Tipping Point,” you’ll see that it used to be cut very short and conservatively. But, on a whim, I let it grow wild, as it had been when I was teenager. Immediately, in very small but significant ways, my life changed. I started getting speeding tickets all the time–and I had never gotten any before. I started getting pulled out of airport security lines for special attention. And one day, while walking along 14th Street in downtown Manhattan, a police van pulled up on the sidewalk, and three officers jumped out. They were looking, it turned out, for a rapist, and the rapist, they said, looked a lot like me. They pulled out the sketch and the description. I looked at it, and pointed out to them as nicely as I could that in fact the rapist looked nothing at all like me. He was much taller, and much heavier, and about fifteen years younger (and, I added, in a largely futile attempt at humor, not nearly as good-looking.) All we had in common was a large head of curly hair. After twenty minutes or so, the officers finally agreed with me, and let me go. On a scale of things, I realize this was a trivial misunderstanding. African-Americans in the United State suffer indignities far worse than this all the time. But what struck me was how even more subtle and absurd the stereotyping was in my case: this wasn’t about something really obvious like skin color, or age, or height, or weight. It was just about hair. Something about the first impression created by my hair derailed every other consideration in the hunt for the rapist, and the impression formed in those first two seconds exerted a powerful hold over the officers’ thinking over the next twenty minutes. That episode on the street got me thinking about the weird power of first impressions.

    4. But that’s an example of a bad case of thin-slicing. The police officers jumped to a conclusion about you that was wrong. Does “Blink” talk about when rapid cognition goes awry?

    Yes. That’s a big part of the book as well. I’m very interested in figuring out those kinds of situations where we need to be careful with our powers of rapid cognition. For instance, I have a chapter where I talk a lot about what it means for a man to be tall. I called up several hundred of the Fortune 500 companies in the U.S. and asked them how tall their CEOs were. And the answer is that they are almost all tall. Now that’s weird. There is no correlation between height and intelligence, or height and judgment, or height and the ability to motivate and lead people. But for some reason corporations overwhelmingly choose tall people for leadership roles. I think that’s an example of bad rapid cognition: there is something going on in the first few seconds of meeting a tall person which makes us predisposed toward thinking of that person as an effective leader, the same way that the police looked at my hair and decided I resembled a criminal. I call this the “Warren Harding Error” (you’ll have to read “Blink” to figure out why), and I think we make Warren Harding Errors in all kind of situations– particularly when it comes to hiring. With “Blink,” I’m trying to help people distinguish their good rapid cognition from their bad rapid cognition.

    5. What kind of a book is “Blink”?

    I used to get that question all the time with “The Tipping Point,” and I never really had a good answer. The best I could come up with was to say that it was an intellectual adventure story. I would describe “Blink” the same way. There is a lot of psychology in this book. In fact, the core of the book is research from a very new and quite extraordinary field in psychology that hasn’t really been written about yet for a general audience. But those ideas are illustrated using stories from literally every corner of society. In just the first four chapters, I discuss, among other things: marriage, World War Two code-breaking, ancient Greek sculpture, New Jersey’s best car dealer, Tom Hanks, speed-dating, medical malpractice, how to hit a topspin forehand, and what you can learn from someone by looking around their bedroom. So what does that make “Blink?” Fun, I hope.

    6. What do you want people to take away from “Blink”?

    I guess I just want to get people to take rapid cognition seriously. When it comes to something like dating, we all readily admit to the importance of what happens in the first instant when two people meet. But we won’t admit to the importance of what happens in the first two seconds when we talk about what happens when someone encounters a new idea, or when we interview someone for a job, or when a military general has to make a decision in the heat of battle.

    “The Tipping Point” was concerned with grand themes, with figuring out the rules by which social change happens. “Blink” is quite different. It is concerned with the smallest components of our everyday lives–with the content and origin of those instantaneous impressions and conclusions that bubble up whenever we meet a new person, or confront a complex situation, or have to make a decision under conditions of stress. I think its time we paid more attention to those fleeting moments. I think that if we did, it would change the way wars are fought, the kind of products we see on the shelves, the kinds of movies that get made, the way police officers are trained, the way couples are counseled, the way job interviews are conducted and on and on–and if you combine all those little changes together you end up with a different and happier world.

    #1241779
    manaman
    Participant

    @Kung Fu Fader 442283 wrote:

    I get this sometimes .. it’s strange … another thing to think about is … mby you made it happen! O.o

    Im in a playground in school, in rockchester kent, this is spring 1980 im sitting on the grass in this playground thats just opened, i see myself get up from where im sitting and run up the field, and bang heads with the most liked guy in school, who had just started to get to like me.Instantly i jump up and run up the field and bang heads with the coolest guy in school, who jumps up and says ‘what the fuck did you do that for ideit’, and never really liked me after that

    #1241785
    mungo1972
    Participant

    Hi Tank Girl ,
    Ill have a look at the Blink book , might explain a few things to me 🙂 . Thats if i can understand it lol , if i do get it and get stuck might have to ask you lol ……ooohhh Mungo suddenly becomes a pain in the ass lol

    regards
    Mungo

    #1241786
    mungo1972
    Participant

    Hi Manaman,
    Why did you do that lol , you saw what was about to happen and you could of stayed on the grass , yet you still got up and ran at the kid and butted him ? . Your vision lol , i guess it felt right at the time 🙂

    regards
    Mungo

    #1241740
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @mungo1972 442398 wrote:

    Hi Tank Girl ,
    Ill have a look at the Blink book , might explain a few things to me 🙂 . Thats if i can understand it lol , if i do get it and get stuck might have to ask you lol ……ooohhh Mungo suddenly becomes a pain in the ass lol

    regards
    Mungo

    Honestly mate, you’ll have no trouble – Malcolm Gladwell is really easy to read – and I think he makes alot of sense

    #1241735
    BioTech
    Participant

    Tank Girl got in there before me but I agree with her. It’s a form of highly tuned intuition based upon previous experiences and reaction.

    That Blink book looks good though. Will have to have a look at that, but I seem to be drowning under a pile of unread books at the mo!

    #1241759
    georgeliverpool94
    Participant

    yer when in the bookies and the roulete when spinin can i guess the number lol

    #1241760
    georgeliverpool94
    Participant

    fire pon the babylon

    #1241787
    mungo1972
    Participant

    Hi Kung Fu Fader ,
    ” another thing to think about is … mby you made it happen! O.o ” …….OOhhh the force is strong in this one lol , as Mungo moves small children by an unseen force into the paths of on comming vehicles !!!!! . I think thats why i got the sack from being a lolly pop lady …….one im no lady and two the school run was never the same after little Jonny got squished by that school bus !!!!

    oh well it was an experience lol

    regards
    Mungo

    #1241713
    Anonymous

    @mungo1972 442270 wrote:

    For an example and it happens mostly when im driving , but in other situations as well . For example i was driving along a road past a row of houses , i see this kid come around the corner on a push bike and some how with out seeing i know the second kid isnt gonna make the turn on the foot path and end up falling in the road . This i saw all before it happened and before i knew there was a second kid . Yet still i moved out to the center of the road even though the first kid had passed me.

    this is common but doesn’t take into account all the times you see a kid next to a road and have the same thought but then said kid doesn’t run into the road and you think nothing of your thought. Its a bit like when someone loses a loved one in a car accident (for example) and says “I just knew something was wrong” but then doesn’t account for the fact that she probably always had that thought when the loved one was late for no reason. Its just that the thought was small (almost imperceptibly small usually I would suggest unless they are of a nervous disposition) and silly before it was proven to be correct where upon it becomes some kind of “6th sense” as you say.

    That would be my take on it anyway.

    #1241741
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @extraslim 442674 wrote:

    this is common but doesn’t take into account all the times you see a kid next to a road and have the same thought but then said kid doesn’t run into the road and you think nothing of your thought. Its a bit like when someone loses a loved one in a car accident (for example) and says “I just knew something was wrong” but then doesn’t account for the fact that she probably always had that thought when the loved one was late for no reason. Its just that the thought was small (almost imperceptibly small usually I would suggest unless they are of a nervous disposition) and silly before it was proven to be correct where upon it becomes some kind of “6th sense” as you say.

    That would be my take on it anyway.

    yeh really interesting – the book I mentioned earlier about this sort of thing – reminds me of this lecture I saw on happiness and how we change our beliefs to fit with staying happy – loose a job – well I never liked it anyway, get dumped – well we wernt going anywhere etc, I’ll try and find it and post it

    #1241742
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    YouTube – ‪Dan Gilbert: Why are we happy? Why aren't we happy?‬‏

    Dan Gilbert on stumbleing into happiness

    But this should be the malcolm gladwell link to save you reading the book mungo ;P

    YouTube – ‪Malcolm Gladwell – Blink – full show‬‏

    and another good book by him

    YouTube – ‪Malcolm Gladwell Outliers‬‏

    YouTube – ‪Malcolm Gladwell – Why do some succeed where others fail? What makes high-achievers different?‬‏

    (can you tell yet he’s one of my favoirte authors :P)

    #1241714
    Anonymous

    @Tank Girl 442677 wrote:

    reminds me of this lecture I saw on happiness and how we change our beliefs to fit with staying happy

    I have noticed this in other people a lot its a skill I lack a lot of the time, think depressed people tend to do the reverse. My mum did it the other month, damaged her car in a car park and by the time we got home it was the architects fault not hers. Pretty sure my GF studied the effect for her psychology degree sure she had a name for it but cannot recall.

    #1241743
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @extraslim 442685 wrote:

    I have noticed this in other people a lot its a skill I lack a lot of the time, think depressed people tend to do the reverse. My mum did it the other month, damaged her car in a car park and by the time we got home it was the architects fault not hers. Pretty sure my GF studied the effect for her psychology degree sure she had a name for it but cannot recall.

    I’m sure it has a name – everything else does!! lol

    The thing with how you think also has a name ‘negative bias’ its the ops of ‘rose tinted glasses’ an inability to see anything other than the negative in life and is a symptom of depression,

    I work with this alot, and how to try and see alternatives and its not about being ‘possitive’ but realistic…
    ie splitting up from someone and only ever remembering the negatives of the relationship but remembering that there prob were some possitive times too, I know I’ve done this in the past!

    #1241715
    Anonymous

    @Tank Girl 442688 wrote:

    I’m sure it has a name – everything else does!! lol

    The thing with how you think also has a name ‘negative bias’ its the ops of ‘rose tinted glasses’ an inability to see anything other than the negative in life and is a symptom of depression,

    I work with this alot, and how to try and see alternatives and its not about being ‘possitive’ but realistic…
    ie splitting up from someone and only ever remembering the negatives of the relationship but remembering that there prob were some possitive times too, I know I’ve done this in the past!

    gotta love psychology really interesting field. Rose tinted glasses is a classic think everyone does that. I look back on the past with fondness when in reality it was worse!

    #1241744
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @extraslim 442692 wrote:

    gotta love psychology really interesting field. Rose tinted glasses is a classic think everyone does that. I look back on the past with fondness when in reality it was worse!

    ha ha – you even managed to put a negative tint on your rose 😛

    #1241788
    mungo1972
    Participant

    Hi Tank Girl and Extraslim ,
    Yep wish i had those rose tinted glasses 🙂 ……but then i’d look like the milky bar kid !!!! as all glasses make me look like the milky bar kid !!!! . I some times find myself remembering or thinking about stupid things i have done or when some one had done me wrong !!! . Try not to do this as it used to put me in a mood , now i change the subject in my head and it seems to work .

    However i seem to get dreams that can put me back in a mood from things that happened in the past !!! , not worked out how to sort that puppy out but if i do ill let you know 🙂

    Regards
    Mungo
    the milky bar kid is strong and tough lol the milky bars are on me 🙂

    #1241745
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @mungo1972 442738 wrote:

    I some times find myself remembering or thinking about stupid things i have done or when some one had done me wrong !!! . Try not to do this as it used to put me in a mood , now i change the subject in my head and it seems to work .

    yes rumination is a bad thing and a viscious cycle and doesnt help one bit

    #1241790
    mungo1972
    Participant

    Hi Tank Girl ,
    No your right , its almost sef destructive !!! . Mad how the brain can do that to its self !!! , still i dont do it as much now . Rumination im gonna have to look that up now , never knew what it was called . Thanks Tank Girl …..if i read up on it it’s not gonna say im a complete nutter or anything ? ………as they say ignorance is blish lol

    regards
    Mungo

    #1241746
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @mungo1972 442742 wrote:

    Hi Tank Girl ,
    No your right , its almost sef destructive !!! . Mad how the brain can do that to its self !!! , still i dont do it as much now . Rumination im gonna have to look that up now , never knew what it was called . Thanks Tank Girl …..if i read up on it it’s not gonna say im a complete nutter or anything ? ………as they say ignorance is blish lol

    regards
    Mungo

    the thing with all of these ‘things’ is WE ALL DO IT

    negative bias, rumination, excluding possitives, having ‘ceratin core beliefs’ and ‘negative thougts’ about ourselves. other and the future
    etc etc etc
    the best thing to do is to become aware of how we think and start to do things differently – try new stuff

    this course has prob made me think more about myself compaired to any other (I’m wondering if its coz its been so intense) but I hope and think I have changed as I used to do all this to a negative impact on my life

    one of the biggest things I have learnt over the last few years is choice and that I dont have to put up with stuff if I dont want to = I dont need to be hit or treated that back I can just say no
    This was a big thing for me – as I’d stayed with someone for ages thinking I didnt have a ‘good enough’ reason to leave, desptie being very unhappy

    #1241716
    Anonymous

    @Tank Girl 442744 wrote:

    the thing with all of these ‘things’ is WE ALL DO IT

    negative bias, rumination, excluding possitives, having ‘ceratin core beliefs’ and ‘negative thougts’ about ourselves. other and the future
    etc etc etc
    the best thing to do is to become aware of how we think and start to do things differently – try new stuff

    this just leads to positive bias though thats what always gets me. Its just as untrue. And its so hard to make my brain believe it grrrrrrrrr

    #1241747
    Tank Girl
    Participant

    @extraslim 442746 wrote:

    this just leads to positive bias though thats what always gets me. Its just as untrue. And its so hard to make my brain believe it grrrrrrrrr

    nope a REALISTIC way of thinking

    yes shit happens, yes life can be hard and tough and yes we all have bad days but thats not a reason to totally disregard the sun shinning, people smiling, stuff gong right (even how small it is ) and enjoying stuff we are good at or enjoy, and in its basic reality – just being alive!

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Forums The Vibe Chat Do any of you know when things are gonna happen before they actually do ?