Forums The Vibe Chat day of rage my arse!

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  • #1051201
    Minghead
    Participant

    well ive just come back from lunch and the centre of bristol is at a standstill with teachers & civil servants protesting, theyve all got there kids with them and it all seems very controlled, very peacefull.

    now ive just sat down for me coffe and a quick read of the paper and read that some orginisation called the black bloc are hijacking the protests and want confrontation in fact and i quote

    Jake Slade posted: “Greece is nothing conpared (sic) to what will happen in London on Thursday.”

    so anyone from london confirm that all hell is breaking loose or is it going peacefully?

    apprently all the civillian workers for the police & call centre staff have all left because of this! i cant find nothing online but was curios

    #1241638
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    @Minghead 442029 wrote:

    apprently all the civillian workers for the police & call centre staff have all left because of this!

    they haven’t left because of any “riot” – its more that they are members of the same trade union as most public service workers so would have been encouraged to go out on strike..

    I don’t think anarchists will have that much luck hijacking the march either, it is full of folk such as CCTV operators, HM Revenue and Customs officers and police civillian staff who will have no problem about dobbing peoplle in – they are marching for a well provided state public service, not against one… probably also be 15 year old wannabe rude boys throwing rocks and busted by their own teachers :laugh_at:

    #1241647
    Minghead
    Participant

    @General Lighting 442033 wrote:

    they haven’t left because of any “riot” – its more that they are members of the same trade union as most public service workers so would have been encouraged to go out on strike..

    I don’t think anarchists will have that much luck hijacking the march either, it is full of folk such as CCTV operators, HM Revenue and Customs officers and police civillian staff who will have no problem about dobbing peoplle in – they are marching for a well provided state public service, not against one… probably also be 15 year old wannabe rude boys throwing rocks and busted by their own teachers :laugh_at:

    i did think that, you can just imagine a headteacher in the march giving sum young lad a right dressing down!

    to compare it to greece is just bonkers i think and show just how narrow minded some people are

    #1241651
    kiwifruit
    Participant

    I’m meeting up with someone in the march later on today for dinner so will get the low down ๐Ÿ™‚

    #1241639
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    also because much of this march is about pensions and long term benefits it is going to be more relevant to older public service workers. younger ones (I was once one myself) are employed on fixed term contracts and you don’t get the old style pension but a cheaper one.

    TBH whether or not I agree with all their decisions, I accept the fact that public service workers often operate in unpleasant and difficult environments, they often have to carry out tasks they disagree with (for instance I know many Police officers are unhappy about having to arrest well behaved middle class drugs users for small possession where there is no violence/anti social behaviour associated) and do not have much of the autonomy of their private sector counterparts. For instance if I was in public service doing the same job today I’d have to fill out a file of paperwork before I could touch a server rather than just going and doing the work..

    I don’t think we should be like France where there is 10% more tax on everything due to public sector costs but at the same time the frontline workers deserve some respect and have the right to strike just like anyone else does..

    Also well run public services help private business. I work for a private business today but a lot of our custom comes from the public sector..

    #1241648
    Minghead
    Participant

    @kiwifruit 442035 wrote:

    I’m meeting up with someone in the march later on today for dinner so will get the low down ๐Ÿ™‚

    ahh good work!

    #1241649
    Minghead
    Participant

    @General Lighting 442036 wrote:

    also because much of this march is about pensions and long term benefits it is going to be more relevant to older public service workers. younger ones (I was once one myself) are employed on fixed term contracts and you don’t get the old style pension but a cheaper one.

    TBH whether or not I agree with all their decisions, I accept the fact that public service workers often operate in unpleasant and difficult environments, they often have to carry out tasks they disagree with (for instance I know many Police officers are unhappy about having to arrest well behaved middle class drugs users for small possession where there is no violence/anti social behaviour associated) and do not have much of the autonomy of their private sector counterparts. For instance if I was in public service doing the same job today I’d have to fill out a file of paperwork before I could touch a server rather than just going and doing the work..

    I don’t think we should be like France where there is 10% more tax on everything due to public sector costs but at the same time the frontline workers deserve some respect and have the right to strike just like anyone else does..

    Also well run public services help private business. I work for a private business today but a lot of our custom comes from the public sector..

    it is for the above type reasons that i just could not be a policeman, my cousin was a special and he just couldnt handle carrying out parts of his job wich fundementaly went against his views.

    public services workers are a nessicity in todays coultre that we live in, and if they are not being heard then they should strike, i watched a tory mp going on about how the general public would wonder why these peolpe are striking on thursdau and i just thought – how out of touch are you!?!?!?! then the same mp i think said that parents should accompany their children into school to help the teachers that are staying behind! or take their kids into work!!

    i just think our governments are sooo out of touch, we must look allmoast repressed to the rest of europe at times!

    #1241640
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    @Minghead 442038 wrote:

    i just think our governments are sooo out of touch, we must look allmoast repressed to the rest of europe at times!

    there are as many if not more clueless right wingers in Europe (both politicians and peopel), its just that because of nationalism they tend not to speak English so you only see this if you look at the media in their native languages. Many of them envy England because of Thatcho and also contrary to popular misconception the public sector do not directly interfere with private business half as much as they do in other Euro-nations (which makes the hostility levelled against UK public sector workers even more irrational).

    #1241650
    Moonie
    Participant

    The most rage from a teacher I’ve seen all day was my mum, and she was at work an hour ago!

    #1241644
    GiantMidget
    Participant

    @Minghead 442029 wrote:

    Jake Slade posted: “Greece is nothing conpared (sic) to what will happen in London on Thursday.”

    [/COLOR][/LEFT]

    That geezer sounds like a right twat. The situation in Greece is FAR worse than we are facing here. Although had Labour still been in power today we probably would be in the same position as the Greeks are. :/

    It’s hard to find much sympathy for those striking today. Loads of people I know have had their day disrupted, some having to take the days off unpaid to look after their kids. People I know ain’t happy at all.

    If this strike is the first of many then the general public will turn on them very quickly imo.

    #1241635
    Anonymous

    i sympathise with them completely, good for them for standing up to the government, even though the david cameron is trying to bully them out of action. i wouldn’t want to work longer, pay more into my pension and get less out of it. and to be honest, teachers have chosen the best time to strike, after all the exams. they could have caused so much more disruption but doing it during the exams.

    #1241645
    GiantMidget
    Participant

    There’s never a best time to strike, not when it disrupts the lives of millions of hard working people. :/

    #1241637
    Anonymous

    I am not sure I support the strikers dont see why society should spend so much to fund their pensions; everyone is facing an increasing retirement age. But I am no expert.

    #1241641
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    @GiantMidget 442048 wrote:

    That geezer sounds like a right twat. The situation in Greece is FAR worse than we are facing here. Although had Labour still been in power today we probably would be in the same position as the Greeks are. :/

    Greece was and is in a lot worse position irrespective of what politicians are in power. A lot of folk, rich and poor alike are corrupt and refuses to pay any taxes, not like UK where most people at least pay them begrudgingly or places like DK / DE / NL where by and large people accept taxes for good public service.

    There is every chance that social unrest leads to GR losing its democracy and the army take control over the country, and this has happened in the EU before even in my lifetime. Spain was under military dictatorship until well into the 1970s. And TBH Greece isn’t as vital to the European economy as richer nations like Germany, France, the UK or the Netherlands. If they have any sense they might leave the Euro before they are pushed or the loss of economic sovereignty leads to unpleasant situations.

    #1241642
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    @GiantMidget 442059 wrote:

    There’s never a best time to strike, not when it disrupts the lives of millions of hard working people. :/

    @extraslim 442062 wrote:

    I am not sure I support the strikers dont see why society should spend so much to fund their pensions; everyone is facing an increasing retirement age. But I am no expert.

    its not even an issue of support or sympathy. In a modern EU nation with human rights legislations any workers have have the right to strike until they cause a public state of emergency. At that point, the public safety authorities take over control. (This is the same anywhere in Europe).

    All this is minor compared to what happened in Europe during the 1980s – even in England it eventually led to social unrest, and people getting hurt and killed – particularly up North during the miners strike. In France and some other countries, extremists of both sides of the political spectrum actually took up firearms and shot dead their opponents.

    Those of us who have grown up in the 1990s have lived in comparatively good times of economic and political stability – these times are gone and not coming back.

    #1241646
    GiantMidget
    Participant

    I heard they are thinking of leaving the Euro or have been advised to by several EU nations. I wonder if the Euro is on borrowed time? Well glad we didn’t enter into it!

    #1241643
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    @GiantMidget 442067 wrote:

    I heard they are thinking of leaving the Euro or have been advised to by several EU nations. I wonder if the Euro is on borrowed time? Well glad we didn’t enter into it!

    because of the costs of reverting back to national currencies, some richer nations or those with long standing trade links (such as BE, NL, DE, LU) might keep it. I was speaking to a Dutch accountant about computer systems used in finance some years ago and they said that because of the Euro they were able to adopt a very useful secure electronics payment system that Germany uses and thus get rid of paper cheques (they found it very amusing that we still use them in Britain).

    bear in mind also lots of nations are in the EU but do not have the Euro currency, as well as the UK the same applies to DK and (I think) SE and all the new ones like PL, BG, RO etc..

    However, there is every chance also that a crisis in the Euro as well as the Middle Eastern political problems will take the Schengen agreement down. This will mean that when you travel to Europe strong national borders will exist once more, and Douane/Customs/Zoll at every one of them. This will have a obvious impact on the music scene associated with European travel and party drugs.

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Forums The Vibe Chat day of rage my arse!