Forums The Vibe Chat Learn Jafaikan in two minutes

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  • #1037477
    titch
    Participant
    #1069836
    titch
    Participant
    #1069833
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    manz was chatting like dat bare time ago innit.. its taken these researchers and journos about 2 years to pick up on this phenomenon

    most young people in SE and Eastern England speak like this anyway now, with or without the slang words; there are local variants as well particularly amongst crowds of ravers and the same word has different meanings.

    For instance “stacking” in Reading meant consuming loads of pills, or to be involved in a nasty collision on your bike/skateboard or in your car but in Eastern England it is the same as “moshing”

    I read a forum where one chap from Needham Market who attends the local parties is also trying to reintroduce old Suffolk words

    http://www.foxearth.org.uk/dictionary.html

    I tend to speak with friends or younger people in “Estuary English” (which is the wider version of the former London accent) although sometimes you have to avoid slang terms (particularly the potentially offensive ones) or speak “properly” when speaking to older adults or if you are in a workplace situation.

    Its no different from the Scots in call centres who have to abandon using Scots terms as (most) English people may not understand them.

    Some slang terms have also got a bad reputation as they are associated with a rather violent, misogynistic street culture prevalent in some areas of London and SE, and were widely featured in the reporting of the Mary Ann Leneghan murder case.

    http://www.partyvibe.com/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=4036&postcount=1

    true ravers slang IMO has a rather more positive, mischeivious or just plain bizzare nature to it…

    http://www.partyvibe.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=4454&highlight=slang

    I do try to at least write in International English (and explain “local” stuff) these days because there are people from all four countries of the UK, every region and and every country in the World here and if I am discussing some complicated technical or political matter I want to try and be understood by as many as possible!

    #1069835
    Anonymous

    the whole point of slang is to make it possible for people to share dissenting points of veiw, or to discuss taboo subjects or phenomena, without the prevailing authorities knowing what they are on about. this is why slang is looked down on, at least by forms of authority, incuding the hateful english dictionary, as it facilitates societies growth in a manner unacceptable to the prevalent power structure. i love slang, and i love using it even better round people who have no idea and are square. my girlfreinds parents pretend to be all shocked, but i know they just feel excluded, and im glad they do. fucking middle english snobs.

    unsuprisingly, the articles are totally cringworthy and out of touch. i mean how can they be so proud of a story thats at least 5-6 years old? fucking jokers. i steeled myself and even read the mail’s version, despite swearing never to read it again because of the apoplectic rages it sends me in.

    genuine daily mail reader quote from bottom of the page:

    “It is an ugly, coarse, made-up speak. The lack of any respect towards people continues.”

    – P.Kish, London,UK

    nuff sed.

    #1069834
    General Lighting
    Moderator

    in former UK colonies many people use a version of English tailored to their local language patterns so locals can assert their identity whilst still using English for communication and business purposes.

    For instance I knew devang was Indian from his first post on here (without even checking the IP address) as he wrote in the same way as one of my former work colleagues who is also from India.

    In Malaysia and Singapore people often speak “Manglish” or “Singlish”, which contains a variety of local phrases including Chinese and Malay words.

    Some terms sound ruder than they actually are – like the saying “talking cock” which actually means to boast and crow and make a big din at inappropriate times like a rooster often does, in Eastern countries “cock” usually just refers to the male of a species of bird – and isn’t used as often to mean a slang term for the penis.

    there is a satirical comedy site from singapore

    http://www.talkingcock.com

    which contains a glossary of the slang terms at the right hand side of each post, presumably so foreigners can understand them – but the Government was actually trying to close them down for speaking “bad English” (despite the national language being Mandarin Chinese!)

    “It is an ugly, coarse, made-up speak. The lack of any respect towards people continues.”

    I thought he was talking about the Daily Mail 😉

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Forums The Vibe Chat Learn Jafaikan in two minutes