Forums Radionics Pirate Radio The Boat That Rocked

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1055925
    AvatarMadPsy
    Participant

    So, with keeping legal liability in mind…

    Everyone on this forum should download ‘The Boat That Rocked’ from isohunt.com. If you’ve not already seen it (and even if you have) it’s well worth a watch. raaaraaaraaa

    #1273638
    Avatarpyross.
    Participant

    Is a really good film, definitely recommend giving it a watch!

    #1273632
    AvatarAnonymous

    I thought it was utter shite. Got terrible reviews and I can see why.

    Shame as its subject matter was very interesting.

    #1273633
    AvatarGeneral Lighting
    Moderator

    the ship and the studio equipment used is correct (I think its the Ross Revenge that Radio Caroline still own) the storyline is not at all accurate, it is over romanticised. the reality of 1960s pirate broadcasters is that they were hijacked by the money men (including the Conservative party!) and that the infighting led to a man being shot dead which is why they all got locked off.

    Also the North Sea is not a pleasant place to be on board ship in poor weather.

    #1273637
    AvatarPat McDonald
    Participant

    @General Lighting 548021 wrote:

    Also the North Sea is not a pleasant place to be on board ship in poor weather.

    It’s not too bad if there’s a bar with music and the ship has stabilisers fitted.

    #1273634
    AvatarGeneral Lighting
    Moderator

    @photographthesun 548001 wrote:

    I thought it was utter shite. Got terrible reviews and I can see why.

    Shame as its subject matter was very interesting.

    “Zeezenders in woelig water” is a more accurate documentary (but entirely in Dutch and about 40 years old movie film shot on location so the soundtrack is not that good quality). You do get bits of it translated/subtitled turning up on youtube. Also the Radio Veronica lot rebuilt their studio in some hotel and had a reunion of all the presenters (now well into their 60s and 70s!)

    #1273635
    AvatarGeneral Lighting
    Moderator

    @Pat McDonald 548042 wrote:

    It’s not too bad if there’s a bar with music and the ship has stabilisers fitted.

    I’ve heard from a few in the know that booze was actually rationed (as much due to logistics of getting it aboard) – and seen on film that though they did have proper old school pirate style barrels hoist aloft, they didn’t contain grog but the top unscrewed and inside were spools of tape (180mm spool or 7″, about an hours worth of programme material) on which news and adverts were delivered). Veronica and Noordzee [1] had the shelves on which the tapes were kept angled with a wooden lip added to the front, so the tapes would not be tipped out as the vessel encountered rough seas.

    a fair amount of cannabis was tolerated provided the ship wasn’t seen as part of a obvious smuggling route or that mainstream journalists found out (this happened once with Caroline, a block was put in a parcel with a spare quartz for the transmitter. BRT (Belgium radio and TV) were filming and someone thought it would be a good idea to show the quartz to the camera crew (normally its locked up in the TX room behind metal panels as there’s about 10 000 V live busbars and all sorts else in there, plus the RF would have made even a Nagra tape recorder lose its speed regulation – no portable video in those days, news was made on movie film and the sound recorded separately on the same type of tape used in the radio station but on a smaller 130mm (5″ spool).

    Unfortunately whoever was showing the quartz to the journos forgot about the extra contents and the block of hash ended up being accidentally tipped out on deck.

    By the 80s Laser 558 would have someone in London get the 7″ vinyl singles and copy them to NAB carts which worked far better on board ship.

    Here are some pics of the equipment mentioned for the benefit of younger folk who might never have seen it.

    this is a Nagra. you will still pay near โ‚ฌ400 even for a half knackered one.

    NAGRA--TYPE3---PL-GR.jpg

    One more commonly used by both film makers and radio journalists (being cheaper) was the UHER report

    uher9.jpg

    both were usually loaded with 8 LR20 cells (12V) and carried across the shoulder. they were heavy and bulky, and needed careful maintenance to avoid the resulting recording sounding rough.
    the current Ross Revenge
    cemineallmine.jpg

    NAB cartridges and players (they used the same tape in the spools, and operated at 19 cm/s (7.5 ips)) which was acceptable quality for broadcast

    NAB-cartridge.jpg

    a cart player stack

    studio_1_carts.jpg

    today you can do portable recording on pocket size kit and play thousands of tracks from a computer, and its affordable even to teenagers and 20-somethings. So I personally cannot understand excessive nostalgia for the “old days..” (I still wouldn’t mind a Nagra though)

    #1273636
    Avatarleveret
    Participant

    @General Lighting 549139 wrote:

    One more commonly used by both film makers and radio journalists (being cheaper) was the UHER report

    uher9.jpg

    i had one of those for many years and it went all over the country with me by train and on the back of my push bike.

    it was incredibly robust ๐Ÿ™‚ but finally met its end on kirkcaldy station platform when i was running with the bike to get to the brake van for some class 26 diesel action ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ™

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Skip to toolbar